Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)

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Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)

Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Oct 09, 13 6:39 pm

Said to be the "son of SOPA" and "NAFTA on steroids", the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a backdoor corporatism attempt that would in fact have global implications.

This secret push is headed by such infamous companies like Halliburton and Monsanto with the intention of enabling a total global hegemony that essentially makes corporations behind key industries operate with indemnity, essentially more powerful than legal government.

http://m.democracynow.org/stories/13922
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Oct 09, 13 6:45 pm

So while this whole gubment shutdown's happening there's this thing called the Trans-Pacific Partnership trying to be put through to secure a fiat legal system that protects corporations, banks, and oil companies to do all the things people want outlawed. The TPP uses secretative tactics to appear to be just a trade agreement when it actually contains things like a revised SOPA in its bills as well as convoluted nomenclature (jargon, legal language double-talk) that could be interpretted as a legal bypass to restrictions on fracking.

The only congressman allowed to see it went by the name Grayson. He was only allowed to read a small section of it, alone, with no aids and not allowed to take notes.
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Postby Aidan » Wed Oct 09, 13 6:47 pm

Reading into this right now. Scary shit.
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Oct 09, 13 6:48 pm

They are totally relentless and will continue to try to implement what they want in increasingly sneaky ways until the government can be utilized to serve the people instead of special interests.
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Postby clyzm » Wed Oct 09, 13 7:44 pm

Those sneaky bastards

I hope Congress actually reads this bullshit, when it goes up for voting I'm going to make several calls to my local congressman
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Oct 09, 13 7:50 pm

With the UN trying to implement law on the US and other countries and the TPP passing there could be a marriage hegemony with funding and impunity to govern and exploit the world.

Sound familiar?
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Postby clyzm » Wed Oct 09, 13 8:16 pm

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Postby Aidan » Wed Oct 09, 13 10:18 pm

I've read some more on it. Definitely a wolf in sheeps clothing.

Only an approximate 25% of the content is related to the trade agreement. The rest has nothing to do with it.
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Postby Hanover Fist » Mon Nov 11, 13 11:02 pm

This article highlights how corporations are already overstepping parliamentary laws with impunity, even suing the government for the loss of "intellectual property".

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... -democracy.
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Postby Aidan » Tue Nov 12, 13 12:10 am

Hanover Fist wrote:This article highlights how corporations are already overstepping parliamentary laws with impunity, even suing the government for the loss of "intellectual property".

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... -democracy.


Link is dead.
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Postby Psychotic » Tue Nov 12, 13 4:27 am

Ah, I do enjoy reading about policies with far-reaching implications that affect me, and yet I can do nothing to vote against them.

That's what the world calls "justice" and "fair".

"All for one and one for all."
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Postby Siva » Tue Nov 12, 13 12:21 pm

I'm wary of anything that is referred to as 'on steroids'. I think it's a bit of a ridiculous way to express something and represents a bad journalist if one were to write such a thing. At the same time, I pretty much see this kind of shit passing as inevitable -- I didn't really give a shit about SOPA because I buy my shit.

I think alot of the resistance to this garbage is from people who just really don't like paying for shit. I pirate too -- don't get me wrong, but I'll usually go back and buy it.

S'about time we all get jobs, I think.
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Postby Hanover Fist » Tue Nov 12, 13 8:59 pm

Sopa is not actually for stopping piracy, thats just the front for it. Its censorship of the internet. Imagine if the only 'legit' way to access the net was thru a limited access account with a filter. It would be like if Vevo took over more than just youtube.

You should probably actually read the article before posting. It does a lot more also for oil and bio tech to allow for bypass of laws and ordinances and would make a case for companies prevented in any way to be compensated for potential loss of profits.
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Postby Hanover Fist » Tue Nov 12, 13 9:15 pm

Worst of all it would pretty much encourage the next invasive occupation of countries for their resources without approval. Essentially corporations would become as powerful as nations: buying off representatives anywhere to take from locales and ignore the ppl that live there.

In a nutshell the TPP would be a gateway to a new kind of colonialism, not just gentrification.
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Postby Psychotic » Tue Nov 12, 13 9:16 pm

Yeah, SOPA was't about stopping piracy as much as the Westboro Baptist Church is for gay rights. That is to say it isn't and they aren't.

It sets a precedent that would be incredibly horrible for any concept of "freedom".
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Postby Hanover Fist » Tue Nov 12, 13 9:27 pm

So far the only thing that can be done by citizens is writing to Congress or whatever the legislative branch equivalent in Parliament to resist a fast track executive bypass of a congressional approval (the reason for the creation of congress in the first place was to delegate tax and trade laws to representative approval and not be unilaterally passed by the executive).
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Postby Hanover Fist » Tue Nov 12, 13 9:48 pm

Aidan wrote:
Hanover Fist wrote:This article highlights how corporations are already overstepping parliamentary laws with impunity, even suing the government for the loss of "intellectual property".

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... -democracy.


Link is dead.


Here's what it says:
Remember that referendum about whether we should create a single market with the United States? You know, the one that asked whether corporations should have the power to strike down our laws? No, I don't either. Mind you, I spent 10 minutes looking for my watch the other day before I realised I was wearing it. Forgetting about the referendum is another sign of ageing. Because there must have been one, mustn't there? After all that agonising over whether or not we should stay in the European Union, the government wouldn't cede our sovereignty to some shadowy, undemocratic body without consulting us. Would it?

The purpose of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is to remove the regulatory differences between the US and European nations. I mentioned it a couple of weeks ago. But I left out the most important issue: the remarkable ability it would grant big business to sue the living daylights out of governments which try to defend their citizens. It would allow a secretive panel of corporate lawyers to overrule the will of parliament and destroy our legal protections. Yet the defenders of our sovereignty say nothing.The mechanism through which this is achieved is known as investor-state dispute settlement. It's already being used in many parts of the world to kill regulations protecting people and the living planet.The Australian government, after massive debates in and out of parliament, decided that cigarettes should be sold in plain packets, marked only with shocking health warnings. The decision was validated by the Australian supreme court. But, using a trade agreement Australia struck with Hong Kong, the tobacco company Philip Morris has asked an offshore tribunal to award it a vast sum in compensation for the loss of what it calls its intellectual property.During its financial crisis, and in response to public anger over rocketing charges, Argentina imposed a freeze on people's energy and water bills (does this sound familiar?). It was sued by the international utility companies whose vast bills had prompted the government to act. For this and other such crimes, it has been forced to pay out over a billion dollars in compensation. In El Salvador, local communities managed at great cost (three campaigners were murdered) to persuade the government to refuse permission for a vast gold mine which threatened to contaminate their water supplies. A victory for democracy? Not for long, perhaps. The Canadian company which sought to dig the mine is now suing El Salvador for $315m – for the loss of its anticipated future profits.

In Canada, the courts revoked two patents owned by the American drugs firm Eli Lilly, on the grounds that the company had not produced enough evidence that they had the beneficial effects it claimed. Eli Lilly is nowsuing the Canadian government for $500m, and demanding that Canada's patent laws are changed.These companies (along with hundreds of others) are using the investor-state dispute rules embedded in trade treaties signed by the countries they are suing. The rules are enforced by panels which have none of the safeguards we expect in our own courts. The hearings are held in secret. The judges are corporate lawyers, many of whom work for companies of the kind whose cases they hear. Citizens and communities affected by their decisions have no legal standing. There is no right of appeal on the merits of the case. Yet they can overthrow the sovereignty of parliaments and the rulings of supreme courts.You don't believe it? Here's what one of the judges on these tribunals says about his work. "When I wake up at night and think about arbitration, it never ceases to amaze me that sovereign states have agreed to investment arbitration at all ... Three private individuals are entrusted with the power to review, without any restriction or appeal procedure, all actions of the government, all decisions of the courts, and all laws and regulations emanating from parliament."There are no corresponding rights for citizens. We can't use these tribunals to demand better protections from corporate greed. As theDemocracy Centre says, this is "a privatised justice system for global corporations"

.Even if these suits don't succeed, they can exert a powerful chilling effect on legislation. One Canadian government official, speaking about the rules introduced by the North American Free Trade Agreement, remarked: "I've seen the letters from the New York and DC law firms coming up to the Canadian government on virtually every new environmental regulation and proposition in the last five years. They involved dry-cleaning chemicals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, patent law. Virtually all of the new initiatives were targeted and most of them never saw the light of day." Democracy, as a meaningful proposition, is impossible under these circumstances.This is the system to which we will be subject if the transatlantic treaty goes ahead. The US and the European commission, both of which have been captured by the corporations they are supposed to regulate, are pressing for investor-state dispute resolution to be included in the agreement.

The commission justifies this policy by claiming that domestic courts don't offer corporations sufficient protection because they "might be biased or lack independence". Which courts is it talking about? Those of the US? Its own member states? It doesn't say. In fact it fails to produce a single concrete example demonstrating the need for a new, extrajudicial system. It is precisely because our courts are generally not biased or lacking independence that the corporations want to bypass them. The EC seeks to replace open, accountable, sovereign courts with a closed, corrupt system riddled with conflicts of interest and arbitrary powers.Investor-state rules could be used to smash any attempt to save the NHS from corporate control, to re-regulate the banks, to curb the greed of the energy companies, to renationalise the railways, to leave fossil fuels in the ground. These rules shut down democratic alternatives. They outlaw leftwing politics.

This is why there has been no attempt by the UK government to inform us about this monstrous assault on democracy, let alone consult us. This is why the Conservatives who huff and puff about sovereignty are silent. Wake up, people we're being shafted.Twitter: @georgemonbiot. A fully referenced version of this article can be found at monbiot.com
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Postby Psychotic » Tue Nov 12, 13 10:54 pm

My question is why the government itself is not concerned at all about being sued by some random corporate asshole.
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Postby Hanover Fist » Tue Nov 12, 13 11:07 pm

My guess is since Congress already make their money from corporate lobbying there is some kind of promise for total financial security if thry play ball. I suppose since this democracy has been stacked as an oligarcby for so long any corporate sponsor thats akready been operating with indemnity would figure this next step, if made secretly, would solidify their own personal anarcho synicalist style plutocracy and marginalize the rest of the world citizenry to mere consumers almost invisibly.

As it is the people for the most part are only spurred to uniform action thru trending. Majority of ppl do not participate in democracy. That majority is not even aware their rights are now a privilege of those with influence.



Edit:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/opi ... ttarget=no

The WTO
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Postby Clancy Stein » Sun Nov 17, 13 11:45 pm

Going back to parallel similarities in Deus Ex which has taken into account, in some form, almost every conspiracy theory that's been around for the past century. Deus Ex IW implies even newer theories including one world religion, project blue beam, and the ever classic one world curriculum/licensing.

Found this one to be interesting: UNATCO SEEMED TO BE A PLAY ON THE UN AND NATO. THERE IS ALSO AN INFERENCE WITHIN THE NAME TOWARD THE FACTUAL UNESCO

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNESCO

Sounds like a good idea, but it is interesting to note a one world government having a rapid development toward a willing globalization starting in the West shortly after the public acknowledgement of the fall of the Soviet Union.
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Postby Clancy Stein » Sun Nov 17, 13 11:59 pm

I would imagine with the TPP there would be stricter laws upon the internet itself. It will probably limit the freedom of publication above all. If you think the internet includes all exchange and free trade then it starts to make more sense what the Trans-Pacific Partnership entails.
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Postby synthetic » Tue Nov 19, 13 7:26 am

These laws they push are just part of the rope pulling game between the population and the state (which depends on the private sector and corporate groups/conglomerates).

In time a common ground will be established; NSF is funding several projects such as FIA and XIA, that aim to redesign internet architecture. AIP (Duke Uni), standing for Accountable Internet Protocol, is also another of the many such projects. All of them deal with privacy issues, cyber crime, ddos attacks issue and spoofing.

I suspect that in time, unless the laws put strict control on the providers, we will have several internets, some of the quite possibly illegal.
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Nov 20, 13 11:36 pm

Sounds like the way Nets are established in Deus Ex. ISP's are privitized providers of an encrypted Net that is often just a part of the Aquinas MilNet overview unless a shadow network is established off the grid by greyhats.
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Postby Psychotic » Sat Nov 30, 13 10:26 am

All of this is just a load of bollocks against the people themselves in the end.

Think about it: How fucking stupid would you have to be to go around planning bomb attacks or corporate espionage on Facebook?

No smart terrorist uses social networking, and if terrorists aren't smart then you wouldn't need spying because you'd have fucking caught them already.
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Postby Clancy Stein » Sun Dec 01, 13 8:12 am

Just imagine Google plus style shenanigans and restrictions on free use of images for starters. Atm I cant or simply dont want to imagine how the internet would change to being a strict commercial outlet.
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Postby synthetic » Mon Dec 02, 13 6:00 am

Freedom of expression/speech as a human right exists under the presumption that it is protected equally with all recognized human rights. Meaning, that one human right cannot be allowed to violate one or more other human rights. People forget this too often.
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Dec 04, 13 11:18 pm

This is disregarded by hierarchy, as Paul Denton is wont to remind us. If aggregate demand necessitates overproduction because of the onslaught of spending coming from the combination of proletariat consumer/capital needs and bourgeois disposable investing, the status-qua remains by theory of its mandate to exist for the continuance of the market. But the prime fallacy of this Keynesian theory is the reliance on central industry as well as the international value of exchange notes kept up by whatever wealth/resource can be sold for them.

You just have to think of money as a receipt/certificate for actual wealth and then it is easy to see that the value of money is solely dependent on price rates.

http://www.trade2win.com/boards/economi ... -laws.html
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Postby Hanover Fist » Sat Dec 28, 13 1:30 am

Turns out other countries except, as far as I can tell, the American citizenry, can view the text of the TPP but Americans can't because of some issue of "national security".....


http://youtu.be/2UaEzMo0uYc
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Postby Clancy Stein » Wed Jan 15, 14 6:18 pm

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Postby Clancy Stein » Sat Feb 22, 14 7:22 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKdIHdZ ... ata_player

"The WTO is a quasi governmental agency."

Senator Paul openly opposes World Trade agreements in the House. Exposes a corporate agenda to accumulate more revenue thru avoiding taxation and incurring more as well as projected the same kind of price rigging monopolies like Comcast can impose in their respective markets.
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